Sunday, April 15

Ancient? & Yet More News!



LOOK! MORE BREAKING NEWS!!!



It's official. I've been offered, and I've accepted an invitation to mount my first one-man show. Yeeee-Hah! The Historic Preservation Trust of Lancaster County has extended me the chance on September 7 to show my work in their grandly restored Sehner-Ellicott-von Hess House (circa 1787} in the City of Lancaster the site of planning for both the Mason-Dixon survey which forever drew the line between America's North and South - and for the Lewis & Clarke expedition which opened much of the American West (immortalizing the Shoshone woman Sacagawea).
It's about time that I finally tried to put together a cross section of my work, I just haven't decided what to print BIG as opposed to normal. I think I'd like to have at least one grand eye stopper measured in feet instead of inches. Just can't decide what. Perhaps for this audience it should be from my Lancaster City or County collection? I'm open to suggestions. Hmmmm....

<-Click here
Speaking of history, this masoned stone sits atop the marble stairway leading into my home. I found it last year when repairs on a nearby street unearthed it. It's quite heavy. As you know, stones like this were used for ballast on the great sailing ships that came to the Americas empty where they were tossed into great heaps when the hulls were filled with product from the colonies. They were later used for cheap paving and lie under most of the central streets of America's colonial towns.

This is the first of a two part series of images I've taken over the past few months, the most recent which I took last week will get posted tomorrow. My point is... who quarried them? Were they a specific product created in Europe specifically for the boats? Or were they actually torn from the ancient and abandoned roads in the Old World? Am I looking at a Roman or Greek artifact here? Or is it older than that? Apparently they have a significant value today... as you'll see tomorrow. Oh and incidentally... This image was strongly influenced by Andreas Manessinger's cool eye for found design. If you haven't visited Andreas' daily photographic explorations, you have a treat in store.

2 comments:

Bill said...

And the accolades just keep rolling in. Wow, a one man show. You must be overwhelmed with all this recognition coming within the span of just a few days. And now you face the daunting task of selecting which images to place in the show, no easy task there.

As for BIG, measuredinifeetratherthaninches, that's a tough one but keeping in mind that I have no idea about what technically suits a big print my gut tells me that Set Piece, Townhouses Along Lime Street and Homecoming have the potential to knock the socks off anyone walking in the door to view your show. In other categories, although less representative of the area, I would love to see a life size print of the front end of the Ford V8 hanging on the wall.

Now if there's any credence to the axiom that good things happen in three's, I can't help wondering what's next. Once again, congratulations Ted for the well deserved recognition.

advman said...

Ted, what can I say? Thanks for the flowers and my heartfelt congratulations for your success. You really deserve it.

As to the image of the stone, this **is** very much the kind of image I'd make and of course I enjoy it. Needless to say that it still is as byrnesque as it gets :)

Congratulations again

Andreas